Murder in Waiting

June 30, 2020


Murder in Waiting
By: Lynn Cahoon
176 Pages
Publish Date: June 30, 2020

Summary:
At Coffee, Books, & More, Jill’s the boss. But as Amy’s maid-of-honor, she can barely keep up with marching orders--and now she’s in charge of organizing an epic bachelorette! Adding to Jill’s party-planning panic, the South Cove Heritage Society just unceremoniously dumped her historic landmark bid. While vying proposals rush in from a loaded land developer and a pushy travel guide company, Jill finds an unexpected ally in Heritage Society expert, Frank Gleason. But their happy union is cut short when Frank is mowed down in a suspicious hit-and-run. With Amy’s big day on the horizon, Jill vows to catch the killer before she has to catch a bouquet.  --bn.com

In the latest installment of the Tourist Trap Series, Jill is facing contention in every direction. Someone wants the property her house is on and has gone so far as to imply it's willing to be sold. As readers know, no doesn't always mean no until a body ends up dead. Jill needs to find out who is trying to sell off her house and why. Also, attacks are being taken at her business. After being falsely blamed for something, retaliation finds it's way to Coffee, Books & More. Who's trying to ruin her business? Does it have anything to do with things happening with her house and the vacant lot next to it? As if that wasn't enough, Jill is the Maid of Honor to her Bridezilla bestie. Everything comes to a head when the gang travels to Las Vegas for a Bachelor & Bachelerette party. 

I always enjoy catching up with this group of characters. While the mystery part of the story line isn't the as strong as other aspects, it still keeps you intrigued. All the characters are fun and interactive and will keep you entertained until the next book of the series arrives.  If you're in the mood for a light, fun read you will enjoy this book. 

The Grim Reader

June 2, 2020


The Grim Reader
By: Kate Carlisle
336 Pages

Summary:
Brooklyn's hometown of Dharma is hosting it's first Book Festival. Everyone's excited and getting involved. The local bookshop owner even found a first edition of Little Women (the festival theme) for Brooklyn to repair that will be in the silent auction. However, one dead body leads to questions and revelations- not to mention another dead body and other mayhem.

I'm a fairly new reader to this series. I recently discovered it and loved it. While I'm only a few books in, I couldn't pass up the opportunity to read this one. Brooklyn and Derek are newlyweds and full of all the lovey-dovey stuff of newlyweds. When Rebecca, Brooklyn's Mother, is threatened by a not so nice community member, Brooklyn and Derek spring into action. Threats lead to an attempt on her life and the discovery of a fellow festival committee member's dead body. When Lawson is found dead, new revelations comes to light: where did the all the festival money he was in charge of go? 

This story is full of possible suspects and you either like them, or meant not to. While the plot took a bit to get moving and all the action to start happening, once it did you were gripped. You can picture the mountain surroundings and the small town feel as you try to figure out how one thing leads to another. While this book is the 14th in the series, I didn't need to read all the previous books to feel in the know of what's going on. Kate does a great job of giving you whatever background information you may need. 

I enjoyed this book! It was a fun mystery to get lost into. Like I said, I'm a new fan of the series. I look forward to reading the books leading up to this one. Go out and get your hands on this book so you can spend part of your summer solving a mystery.

The Wedding Dress

April 28, 2020


The Wedding Dress
By: Danielle Steel
304 Pages
Release Date: April 28, 2020

Summary:
From the glamorous San Francisco social scene of the 1920s, through war and the social changes of the ’60s, to the rise of Silicon Valley today, this extraordinary novel takes us on a family odyssey that is both heartbreaking and inspiring, as each generation faces the challenges of their day.
 
The Parisian design houses in 1928, the crash of 1929, the losses of war, the drug culture of the 1960s—history holds many surprises, and lives are changed forever. For richer or for poorer, in cramped apartments and grand mansions, the treasured wedding dress made in Paris in 1928 follows each generation into their new lives, and represents different hopes for each of them, as they marry very different men.
 
From inherited fortunes at the outset to self-made men and women, the wedding dress remains a cherished constant for the women who wear it in each generation and forge a destiny of their own. It is a symbol of their remaining traditions and the bond of family they share in an ever-changing world. --bn.com

While it's not one of Danielle's best books, it's not one of her worst either. The storyline did captivate me, though the actual dress the book is named for has a very small role. The book is centered around Eleanor Deveraux- the bride the dress was made for- and her descendents. As you meet her, she is from a highly wealthy banking family. She marries a man of similiar wealth. I enjoyed their love story. It was reminiscent of earlier Danielle Steel books where the husband is always older than the bride. You watch a genuine love unfold and a bond that builds a life on. However, it all comes crashing down while on their honeymoon as the stockmarket crashes.

I enjoyed seeing how the main characters adjust to their new lives. I felt their storylines played out in a realistic way. You see strength rise from sources you wouldn't expect and you see the lasting scars created as lives are never the same again. 

Seeing Eleanor's life play out was intriguing. It wasn't all roses, nor was there an immediate happy ending. She conitues to endure heartbreaks through miscarriages and having her daughter, Camille, rebel. Heartbreak knocks on Eleanore's door again, but also leaves a ray of light to embrace- her granddaughter, Ruby. I do have to say that this book doesn't come with the typical happy ending you expect. Her characters learn to accept their reality and flourish within it. 

Overall, I wouldn't buy this book. I'm glad I read it, but I'm also glad I didn't pay the just under $30.00 price tag. Fans of Danielle Steel will enjoy the story, but I don't see me reading this particular book of hers again. It's definitely one to get from the library. 

The Lions of Fifth Avenue

April 6, 2020


The Lions of Fifth Avenue
By: Fiona Davis
368 pages
Release Date: July 21, 2020

Summary:
It's 1913, and on the surface, Laura Lyons couldn't ask for more out of life—her husband is the superintendent of the New York Public Library, allowing their family to live in an apartment within the grand building, and they are blessed with two children. But headstrong, passionate Laura wants more, and when she takes a leap of faith and applies to the Columbia Journalism School, her world is cracked wide open. As her studies take her all over the city, she finds herself drawn to Greenwich Village's new bohemia, where she discovers the Heterodoxy Club—a radical, all-female group in which women are encouraged to loudly share their opinions on suffrage, birth control, and women's rights. Soon, Laura finds herself questioning her traditional role as wife and mother. But when valuable books are stolen back at the library, threatening the home and institution she loves, she's forced to confront her shifting priorities head on . . . and may just lose everything in the process.

Eighty years later, in 1993, Sadie Donovan struggles with the legacy of her grandmother, the famous essayist Laura Lyons, especially after she's wrangled her dream job as a curator at the New York Public Library. But the job quickly becomes a nightmare when rare manuscripts, notes, and books for the exhibit Sadie's running begin disappearing from the library's famous Berg Collection. Determined to save both the exhibit and her career, the typically risk-adverse Sadie teams up with a private security expert to uncover the culprit. However, things unexpectedly become personal when the investigation leads Sadie to some unwelcome truths about her own family heritage—truths that shed new light on the biggest tragedy in the library's history.   -bn.com

I'm a recent discoverer of the immensely talented Fiona Davis. I've been incredibly blessed to review most of her books. I have loved them all and while this one wasn't my favorite, it was a dleight to read. I've always loved how Miss Davis takes historical fictin out of it's preconcieved box. Rather than sticking with the traditional wars, she takes a thing from the past and wraps it up for us readers in an engrossing package. 

This particular story revolves around Laura Lyons- herself, immediate family and decendents. You start out with her happily married to her husband and living in the esteemed New York Cigty Public Library with their two children. Dreams she had of being a journalist had been placed on the backburner for women weren't typically with careers at the time. An opportunity presents itself with her being able to pursue her dream and the life she knew slowly unravels. Journalism schools allows her to see a world beyond what she currentlty knew. She meets people a woman who she knew from school, but now will open doors- and viewpoints- that she never purseud before. Over time the friendship changes her life in ways the heavily sheltered Laura couldn't have predicted. All this happens as her husband's job is under intense scruiteny as someone is discovered to be stealing books from the library. Within a short period of time, the life Laura started out with looks nothing like the life she ended up with. 

Decades later, Sadie is the granddaughter of the elusive Laura Lyons. By now she has been gone for many years, but more questions than answers appeared to be her legacy. When history repeats itself with new books thefts within the same library, that Sadie is now employed with, she's forced to dig deeper for explanations and those elusive answers. 

I was engrossed in most of the story. As with any reader, some aspects of the story were more intriguing than others. I was fascinated with life within the library. I never knew anyone actually lived within it's walls. I was equally intrigued with the whole journalism school aspect. Fiona Davis makes you feel you were there with each student, in Laura's case embarking on a rare adventure. 

Fans of Fiona Davis will not be disappointed. Once again, she takes an obscure thing in history and make you unable to put it down while she unravels a story within it. Some characters were more relatable than others. Readers will find their favorite to root. You will feel like you're among the characters while everything is happening.


 

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